Knowledgebase Directory
Buy/Wholesale Rehab and Flip Deals

This video is intended to cut the clutter and show you exactly what to do if you’re specifically going to analyze and buy or wholesale a house or any other deal to someone who is going to buy, rehab and flip it.  If you currently are wholesaling houses to cash buyers (or aspire to), you’ll see exactly how to calculate the right offer, figure in your assignment fee and then put together a powerful marketing flyer or a full presentation to blast out to your cash buyers.

If you don’t already have this powerful real estate wholesaling software, there is a free version here or the Premium (which gives you the full marketing capabilities) here.  For more on how to wholesale properties, visit our Wholesaling 101 Course.

Also check out these 2 very detailed case studies:  Wholesaling Case Study 1 (How to calculate offers, figure out ARV, Calculate Profits, etc) and Wholesaling Case Study 2 (How to Get Your Deals Sold Quickly!)

Comments (17 comments so far)


  1. Darren Billips

    I want to know what I have to do to buy a house I found too border house ones a four plex. What’s my next step in getting this??? I need help, I’m a beginner.
    Thanks Darren


    • Eddie Chalkley

      Hi Darren,
      Thanks for reaching out to us, I will email you some information to help you get started in the process.


  2. Erwin Powell

    I am setting in my car at the curb in front of a house. I see poor grounds and weathered exterior. I want to find out if the owner is open to selling, but before I approach the owner I want to be prepared with enough information to at least know what the market value is. How do I get there and what do I need? (in the back of my mind I am wondering if this software will really be of help at this point)


    • Korrie McKeen

      Hi Erwin,

      The first thing you need to determine is what the After Repair Value (ARV) of the house will be. You can check out this article we did about finding ARV and Comps: https://rehabvaluator.com/wholesaling/how-to-calculate-arv-and-find-comps/

      Once you figure out that information, you can plug all of that information into Rehab Valuator to come up with a good purchase price and make a potential offer to the home owner. You can then also use Rehab Valuator to generate presentations to either wholesale the property or get financing to purchase the property yourself. If you have questions, you can email us at support@rehabvaluator.com.


  3. D'Andrea

    These tutorials are very easy to follow and learn from. I am more empowered to do this!


  4. Chauncey Roscoe Vaughn

    I have two possible property for wholesale deals. where to get contract forms? Where to get a quick office calculator?


    • JacobC

      Hi Chauncey,

      When you login to the Rehab Valuator application you’ll find the Quick Offer Calculator under My Resources in the menu. Additionally, if you’re a Rehab Valuator PREMIUM user you’ll find the bonuses section under My Resources. Bonus #2 are the contracts.

      Thanks!


  5. BRUCE PETTAWAY

    I HAVE PROPRTIES IN FOCUS TO BUY AND FLIP. I HAVE SIGNED UP WITH THE JV VALUATOR. WILL I ALSO GET THIS REHABVALUATOR INCLUDED IN MY PACKAGE?


    • JacobC

      Hi Bruce,

      The simple answer is no. Bank Elimination Blueprint (which includes JV Valuator) and Rehab Valuator are two separate products.


  6. Shelby Tollette

    Very helpful. Thanks.


    • Daniil Kleyman

      That’s what we’re here for! 🙂


  7. Crystal

    I am solely focused on wholesale until I get enough capital. I am not sure how to do the calculations for wholesale using this system, it only shows rehabbers


    • Daniil Kleyman

      The same way you evaluate the deal as a rehabber is the same way you evaluate it as a wholesaler. The difference is as a wholesaler, you need to take your assignment fee into account when calculating your offer price. This more detailed case study will help: https://rehabvaluator.com/case-studies/wholesale-case-deal/


  8. Crystal

    In the video at the beginning you said holding cost was $1500 but in the purchase assumptions you put $1000 so the numbers are off. $128,000 instead of $127,500, $60,000 instead of $60,500, 46.88% instead of 47.45%, and 140.63% instead of 142.35%. This was a good mess up, not sure if done on purpose because I instantly went through the whole process learning how to put the numbers in lol. Thank you for the accident even if it wasn’t on purpose


    • Daniil Kleyman

      That’s a good catch! 🙂

  9. Where does the system pull the CMA report from, MLS or tax record? and is the CMA report no older than 6 months?

    Thanks,
    Ray


    • JacobC

      Hi Ray,

      The Comps report is pulled from Zillow. It looks for properties that have sold within the last year, within 1 mile of the target residence, that are similar beds/bads/sq. ft. It pulls up to 25 comps and it weights them based on how recently they sold, how close they are, and how similar in size. We find that in general if there is info in Zillow, at least in regard to recent sales data, that it is generally correct and works great for comps in most areas.